What is your normal oxygen level ?

NORMAL OXYGEN LEVEL

Oxygen is a vital element to complete the process of respiration and sustain your life. The normal oxygen level between adult men and women does not differ but the oxygen requirement is equal to both the genders. Besides there are several factors that influence your body to take in different amount of oxygen based on your gender. Understanding the healthy needs and requirement based on your gender can make your oxygen level normal and healthy. The amount of oxygen your blood carries is called oxygen saturation level which is usually 95% and above in adults. Oxygen is very essential for respiration. Your lungs suck oxygen from air and then heart pumps it to different organs of the body which picks up carbon dioxide from each organ as a byproduct of metabolism to exhale out, completing the cycle of respiration.

This oxygen level in your body is stated to be 95% above in normal status according to a study. But an oxygen saturation level of 92% and less than 92% is not common. This oxygen saturation status can be measured by Pulse Oximeter, a digital device which is used to measure and monitor oxygen level and pulse rate of a human body. Pulse Oximeter is easy to use and there is no need to going to a doctor or a nursing diagnostic centre for you oxygen saturation measurement. The normal arterial oxygen is approximately 75 to 100 mm Hg or millimeters of mercury. If this value reduces to 60 mm Hg then you body needs a supplement oxygen source this might indicate hypoxemia or low blood oxygen.

According to the study by Harvard Health publication, “in normal cases when the blood circulated in your body, 95% to 100% of RBC’s or red blood cells are able to grab oxygen molecule”. This is considered to be normal oxygen saturation level and further can be measure by a digital monitoring device called Pulse Oximeter. The Pulse Oximeter has a probe which connects to a finger, ear lobe or toe finger in case of child and monitors your pulse rate and oxygen level in your blood.

On June 28th, 2016, posted in: Pulse Oximeter by

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